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Handwraps Expert Advice
Wondering what you need in a handwrap? This page helps to answer some of the most commonly asked questions.
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Why do I need handwraps?
Handwraps are an essential piece of protective equipment for boxers. During training, fighters sustain a large amount of impact on their hands and wrists. For the hands, this can often result in scraps, bruises, or cuts to the skin. The wrist can also get bent or sprained should a punch land awkwardly. Handwraps (when used correctly) are designed to reduce the friction of contact on the hand, both on the punching knuckles and on the skin from wearing gloves. A good wrap can also secure the wrist and prevent excessive torque. In addition, wraps can help protect against 'boxer's break', which is a fracturing of the bones in the palm of the hand.

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What are gel glove wraps?
In the last few years gel gloves wraps have become very popular. Instead of wrapping your hands in the traditional way, you can slip on a pair of glove wraps. Glove wraps save a lot of time and are great for beginners that are not confident in applying handwraps. The downsides to using glove wraps is the price, that they need to be replaced fairly frequently, and the wrist protection is lacking (which is important when striking a heavy bag hard).
Do not use gel wraps alone when striking a bag. They will wear out very quickly that way. Invest in a pair of bag gloves to wear over them, it will save you money in the long term.

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What length handwrap is right for me?
If you are an adult male, you will probably want a wrap that is 170" or 180" in length. Some MMA practitioners prefer a shorter 120" wrap, but most boxers prefer the longer. For women, teens, and other individuals with small hands, 120" wraps will fit you better.

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Traditional wraps vs glove-style wraps
A recent development in handwrap technology is a slip on style glove that simulates the effects of a full handwrap. The benefit of these glove wraps is the speed at which you can wear them. You can slip them on and be training in a few seconds.
Traditional handwraps, on the other hand, still offer unparalleled security and protection when applied properly. They can be wrapped tightly and to your specific hand dimensions. The wrap supports the wrist and has been proven to reduce the chance of sprain.

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Traditional weave vs Mexican weave
The two main weave styles for handwraps are traditional (classic) and Mexican. The traditional weave is generally made with 100% cotton and is usually about 2" wide. The cotton is breathable but not particularly elastic. Mexican weave handwraps are a combination of cotton and nylon and have a more elastic quality about them. Some individuals find that the elasticity helps the wrap conform to their hands, but other individuals like the cotton texture of traditional wraps. It's truly a matter of personal taste. There is a third major style of handwrap, and that is gel wrap. These provide a built in layer of gel to add extra padding and protection.

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How to properly apply handwraps
Proper application of handwraps should result in a wrap that is snug but not too tight as to restrict circulation. Here is a guide for applying your wrap (although there are other variations on this classic method): 1.) Hook the thumb loop over your thumb. If your wrap has a velcro side, be sure that that side is face up. 2.) Wrap around your wrist approximately 3 times, depending on the overall length. 3.) Wrap around your thumb once, and then around the wrist/back of hand. Repeat 2-3 times. 4.) After the thumb is secure, you'll be moving up to the knuckles. Take the wrap from the base of the thumb up across the back of the hand to the base of the pinky finger. From there wrap around the knuckles 3 times. 5.) After you've finished that, bring that wrap in between the index finger and thumb, and pull it down across the back of the hand toward the wrist. 6.) Wrap around the wrist once, and the thread up in betwee the middle finger and ring finger. Bring back down toward the wrist and wrap around the wrist again. 7.) From there bring the wrap back up across the back of the hand toward the base of the pinky finger. Proceed to wrap around the knuckles as many times as needed to use the excess slack. 8.) Bring the wrap back down toward the wrist, wrap it around the wrist once, and secure the velcro or hook-and-loop attachment.

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You might also need...
If you need handwraps, you might also be interested in purchasing bag or boxing gloves. Handwraps alone are rarely enough to protect your hands against long, sustained workouts. Bag gloves protect you during training, and boxing gloves protect you during matches. You might also consider getting lace covers which are a quick way to protect opponents from getting hit by the laces or wrist closures on your gloves. Finally, a quick solution for when you need handwrap protection are glove-style wraps, which simulate the thickness and security of handwraps but come in glove form.

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Buy Everlast hand wraps for cheap and get practically free shipping. We also sell bulk handwraps, gel hand wraps and wraps by Ringside, Top Contender, Lonsdale.
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